7 key consumer types

…and which 3 you need to focus on.

Foodservice Hobbyist

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Meet Fran. She’s enjoying middle age, now that the kids can fend for themselves, by working a part-time job and spending quality time with friends, often at restaurants. Lunch might mean a familiar neighborhood place, but dinner is a chance to try something new and have a unique experience while socializing. Because they like to eat out frequently, and they’re mostly middle income, Fran and her friends might split an entree or decide where to go based on a special promotion.

Opportunities for operators

  • Appetizers, small plates and sides play well with Foodservice Hobbyists, who order these items more than any other group as a way to try a new dish, often sharing with tablemates.
  • Food safety is a concern, as are animal-treatment policies and environmental issues. They’ll pay more for healthy callouts on the menu, such as “natural,” “sustainable” or “locally raised.”
  • It’s not all about meat. They are the most likely group to say that meals do not need to include meat, poultry or seafood; think “plant forward.”
  • They’re looking for value at breakfast, even though it’s when they eat out the least. Filling dishes that suit a range of tastes may encourage greater frequency. 

Frequency of visits

 BreakfastLunchDinner
Percent meals at foodservice142724
Number of foodservice occasions per person annually529988

Share of meal occasions

What they eat

Foodservice Hobbyists give the highest ratings to:

  • The Capital Grille
  • Schlotzsky’s
  • Papa Murphy’s Take ‘N’ Bake Pizza
  • Pinkberry
  • Firehouse Subs

These chains see more Foodservice Hobbyists than other chains:

  • Panera Bread
  • Romano’s Macaroni Grill
  • Bonefish Grill
  • P.F. Chang’s China Bistro
  • Logan’s Roadhouse

Different groups use chains differently. For example, Foodservice Hobbyists are heavy users of Wendy’s for afternoon or late-night snacks, whereas it’s a more popular choice for Health Enthusiasts at lunch and Busy Balancers at dinner.

As Foodservice Hobbyists pay very close attention to detail, menu cues for regional ingredients, well-defined and executed preparations, and social responsibility all resonate. Value is communicated to them through these attributes. Unique and interesting menu offerings, a new twist on classics, plating with flair and an overall dedication to ‘personality’ will generate excitement.” —Robert Byrne, manager, market insights at Technomic

Source: technomic


Busy Balancer

Functional Eaters

Affluent Socializers

Bargain Hunters

Habitual Matures

Health Enthusiasts

 

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