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The Bottom Line

Jonathan Maze The Bottom Line

Restaurant Business Executive Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Financing

Why can’t Tim Hortons work in the U.S.?

The chain is ultrapopular in Canada, but not so much here. It’s an issue the chain has perpetually struggled to fix, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Financing

Why delivery is not incremental

If it is incremental, it won’t be for long, and operators have to prepare for it, says RB's The Bottom Line.

The company’s same-store sales have bested all of its competitors in recent years, but traffic growth remains elusive, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Uber, Beyond Meat, and Luckin Coffee offerings show where the industry is headed, says RB’s The Bottom Line, but each has its challenges.

The chain is reportedly looking to sell a stake in the business, suggesting the chain may be ready to speed its growth, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

As it becomes more expensive to eat at the fast-food chain, some customers could seek other options, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The chain is replacing an existing unit with a fast-casual model, and many others could follow if it works, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

According to Technomic data, the generation has been shrinking its visits for the past year, especially in casual dining, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Domino’s is the latest company to question the sustainability of the current model. RB’s The Bottom Line takes a look.

Companies with steeply falling sales frequently turn to franchisees to turn stores around. RB’s The Bottom Line examines whether this is a good idea.

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