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Beverage

Beverage trends spilling into the restaurant industry

Beverage

Less is more

When it comes to wine lists, bigger is not always better.

Beverage

Steal This Idea: Barrel aging for one

The craft-focused bar offers guests the option to buy smaller, individual barrels filled with their own customized, aged cocktail.

Adding an alternate milk isn’t as easy as slapping it on the menu as a simple substitution.

According to the U.S. Tea Association, the tea market has grown from $1.8 billion to $10.4 billion in just over 20 years.

According to a recent Technomic study, women are 30 percent more likely to spend more on adult beverages on-premise than last year. We asked four women who are new and established leaders in the industry to talk about what else is changing for women, both in front of and behind the bar.

Juicing is powering up menus. The recession put a squeeze on sales of made-to-order juices, according to the 2014 Juice & Smoothie Bars in the U.S. report by Los Angeles market researcher IBISWorld. But increased consumer demand for healthy beverages and an expansion of juicing into concepts other than smoothie and juice bars are revitalizing the category, the report says.

To keep cocktail lists current, progressive mixologists are looking to the past, resurrecting old-fashioned mixers and modifiers with modern twists.

To build buzz around traditional winter drinks such as hot chocolate and cider, operators are borrowing tactics from the coffee wars, touting handcrafted techniques and seasonal flavors more often associated with lattes and mochas.

Fads come and go, but true emerging beverage trends have staying power and growth potential. We’ve done some recon on what’s predicted to be the next big thing in craft beer, cocktailing and fast-casual drinks—the developments poised to make dollars and sense for operators in the year ahead.

Latin and Asian cocktails are expanding into new territory.