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Beverage

Beverage trends spilling into the restaurant industry

Beverage

Thinking outside the tap

“What’s on tap?” no longer is a question only beer-loving customers ask, as restaurant operators realize they can make their concepts buzzworthy and more efficient by adding unexpected beverages to the bar tap.

Beverage

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When the Nutritious & Delicious menu debuted at Lazy Dog Restaurant & Bar in 2012, it immediately boosted traffic and frequency of visits during lunch and dinner, attracting both millennials and empty nesters, men and women, says Gabe Caliendo.

Milkshakes and malts—two old-time soda-fountain treats—are seeing big-time action at fast casuals. By differentiating the beverage menu with these indulgences, fast-casual concepts are vying for that between-meal customer who is a regular at the coffee cafe.

Southwest Airlines passengers now sip the airline's signature LIFT® coffee from an improved new cup. It's easy to hold, heat retaining, environmentally friendly and sends an updated brand message for the airline as well.

Operators are attracting patrons by crafting one-of-a-kind milkshakes, some with flavors that go way beyond vanilla, chocolate and even salted caramel. Customers are ordering milkshakes as snacks, desserts or beverages to complement a meal—all of which boost the check.

It’s no secret that iced tea is one of the most profitable non-alcoholic beverages that restaurants can sell. Unsweetened fresh-brewed iced tea is also a great choice for health-conscious people who want something refreshing to quench their thirst but don’t want to drink extra calories.

Eager to maximize their hot beverage sales and profits, restaurant operators are brushing up on vital details in order to meet consumer expectations for flavorful and convenient premium coffee.

For restaurant operators, it’s a given that iced tea is the most-profitable non-alcoholic beverage they can sell. However, the operators who sell the most iced tea don’t take it for granted—they know the brand power of a premium, fresh-brewed iced tea, and they know that when guests don’t see their favorite beverage brands on the menu, they often default to ordering tap water.

Consumers today—particularly millennials—view menu customization options as a need rather than a luxury, according to Food Genius. Offering consumers a chance to create beverages “their way”—think flavored syrups, mix-ins or flavor mash-ups—can generate excitement.

Despite sales of brand-name soft drinks declining, operators are luring customers with creative, housemade sodas.