Food

Food trends and recipes to keep menus fresh

Food

Food trucks roll into RLC

Food trucks fill the streets and parking lots of New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Austin and Portland, Ore. Los Angeles alone counts 9,000 food trucks and carts, including branded vehicles from California Pizza Kitchen and Carl’s Jr. Yet when Ray Villaman, moderator of a trucks panel at the Restaurant Leadership Conference, asked who in the audience has or plans to launch a food truck, only a few hands were raised.

Food

'Lettuce on aisle 9, right by the condoms'

The formidable Duane Reade drugstore chain is stepping up its challenge to restaurants by including a made-to-order salad station in its latest store.

Quenching Americans’ thirst has become a hotbed of menu development. It’s no longer enough to offer plain iced tea, branded carbonated soft drinks and sparkling water. Customers expect flavor innovation, variety and often health benefits as they sip. The same holds true with alcoholic drinks, where freshness and seasonality are a priority.

Some of the most renowned chefs are elevating one of the humblest birds—the chicken—to new heights. We’re not talking fancy sauces, rare spices or hi-tech techniques; instead, these pros are turning to the simplest, most down-home cooking methods—frying and roasting.

Charcuterie plates loaded with salume and prosciutto hit the restaurant scene at full force within the last few years. But what about non-pork eaters who won’t indulge in Speck or Coppa? Enter pastrami.

The summer season provides the perfect opportunity for restaurants to incorporate seasonal flavors into menus.

Before David Burke’s Fabrick opened in New York City last May, Executive Chef Adin Langille worked with the restaurant’s namesake to develop an upscale rendition of chips and dip to fit the modern American shared plates concept. The result: a smooth twist on guacamole that embodies Burke’s style and Langille’s innovation, and still plays to customers’ penchant for the familiar starter.

Pizza Hut only now is getting in the gluten-free game, besting its rivals by launching completely gluten-free pizza this January, crust and toppings included.

Smaller portions of meat go a long way as chefs make room for more vegetables. Here's where food and drink are going next.

Since the surge of Sriracha, other hard-to-pronounce ingredients have been gradually popping up on menus, giving consumers both practice with tongue twisters and opportunities for exotic dining adventures. Here's a look at some striking ingredients on the rise.

  • Page 268