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Leadership

Individuals influencing the direction of the restaurant industry

Leadership

Franchisee of the Month: Paul Saber

Saber, who joined Panera in 2003 after a 17-year run at McDonald’s as a franchisee and senior corporate leader, posed a question that ultimately led to Panera Cares, the company’s groundbreaking pay-what-you-can business model designed to “share the warmth” with those less fortunate.

Leadership

Franchisee of the Month: Gary & Sally Myers

Casual steak and salad-bar chain Sizzler is on the cusp of a comeback and it’s due in part to Gary and Sally Myers, who throughout their nearly 30-year history as Sizzler franchisees have led more than they’ve followed.

He took the stage like a victorious general and made it clear from the get-go that this would be no ordinary presentation. “I don’t do speeches anymore,” former McDonald’s USA CEO Ed Rensi barked to a packed ballroom at the Restaurant Leadership Conference. “I rant.”

Indra Nooyi came aboard PepsiCo in 1994 to steer the foodservice division, visiting front- and back-of-the house operations across America.

Herman Cain still has a chance of becoming the Republican Party's candidate in the 2012 presidential race, the campaign dropout argued in a speech opening the Restaurant Leadership Conference.

Howie Mandel will be playing for laughs during a stand-up appearance Tuesday at the Restaurant Leadership Conference.

Capping off a night out with his wife last winter, Mark Snyder ducked into a local bakery craving a little something sweet.

Chris Partyka bought into the Pizza Patron franchise system seven years ago with three units in San Antonio, intent on developing that market.

Founded in 1981 by Mueller and his brother Richard, RPM is one of those franchisees that could almost annoy corporate with their steady stream of ideas, admits Jim Stansik, executive vice president of franchise relations for Domino’s.

Struggling to reach staffers who seem lost in their own world? Well, have you thought about pottery? That’s the improbable route Bill Strickland took when he set out to turn the disadvantaged of his native Pittsburgh into choice job candidates all but vibrating with enthusiasm. Now a world-renowned motivational authority, Strickland has agreed to recount how he molds workforce stars from prospects that don’t appear to fit the system. His delivery at the Restaurant Leadership Conference promises to be as unusual as the training approach he’s taken.