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Homestyle ingredients and dishes can offer an experience that’s nostalgic and familiar—which is why comfort foods never go out of style.

Today’s diners are more conscious than ever about the foods they eat—what they’re made of, but more importantly, what they’re not made of.

Restaurants are increasingly adding a common pulled pork cut, a Spanish sausage, a trash fish and an upscale beef product to their menus.

Global relishes are poised for growth as operators increasingly use condiments to differentiate.

Bone broth supposedly helps you sleep, aids digestion and nutrition absorption, and strengthens bones and hair. Heck, even Kobe Bryant is a fan, according to SI.

By reformatting the dish—and using ground meat instead of sliced leg—Millman now is able to offer lamb for $15 instead of $35, appealing to younger diners.

According to the U.S. Tea Association, the tea market has grown from $1.8 billion to $10.4 billion in just over 20 years.

Three-fifths of consumers now believe restaurants can offer food that is both healthful and tasty, reports Chicago research company Technomic.

Fewer variations will be offered, but the deletions amount to eight fewer food options and five fewer Value Meals.

Although sandwich consumption is high—people eat more than three per week, reports Chicago research firm Technomic—there’s a lot more competition to differentiate with flavors and ingredients in the quick-service and fast-casual sandwich segment.