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Surprising shifts to less-processed foods and clear examples of enlightened management should have been taken as a loud “Shut up!” by industry scolds.

Licensing products doesn't have to be a huge undertaking. Brands with small programs that they say are lucrative as well as simpler to maintain—and began with relative ease. For restaurateurs looking into licensing, there are lessons to learn at every level.

A Tiramisu Latte and a new breakfast sandwich are among the high-end products quietly being rolled out.

The chain announced today it will make its small-lot coffees roasted at its new Roastery coffeehouse in Seattle available for online order. The delivery service will run $288 for a 12-month subscription.

Licensing products doesn't have to be a huge undertaking. Brands with small programs that they say are lucrative as well as simpler to maintain—and began with relative ease. For restaurateurs looking into licensing, there are lessons to learn at every level.

When asked by Fast Company magazine to name a must-have kitchen gadget not yet invented, Suzanne Goin, chef-owner of Los Angeles’ Lucques and A.O.C. restaurants, chose a tool that would automatically load the dishwasher.

Chef Jeff Miller has spent 11 years at Dunkin’ Brands, working under Frankenthaler, the first of what proved to be a parade of fine-dining chefs to enter chain R&D kitchens. Miller will now oversee a 22-person culinary team at the franchisor.

BloombergBusinessweek opens the doors to the chain’s test kitchen to reveal the innovation team’s source for ideas and how a product goes from prototype to promotion.

How do you stand out? Operators are pondering this question these days, because nobody wants to be a me-too restaurant. We asked some executives how they differentiate themselves, and this is what they told us.

If a restaurant staff knew how much a broken dish or glass cost to replace, they might be more careful when handling it—especially if they benefited from the savings in breakage.