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Keeping communication channels open in a busy restaurant is a daily challenge. Multiple shifts, part-time employees and too few hours in the day often cause information to be lost in the shuffle.

Keeping communication channels open in a busy restaurant is a daily challenge. Multiple shifts, part-time employees and too few hours in the day often cause information to be lost in the shuffle. Employee newsletters are a versatile and inexpensive way to keep in touch with your staff. Distributed in employee mailboxes, or with a paycheck, newsletters are an effective way to keep the information flowing.

Content

Include feedback from your guest comment cards. Good food and server reviews boost morale, and the not so good ones identify specific areas for improvement. Training issues or policy reminders can also be reinforced. Trade Secrets to improve tips are always welcome. Newsletters are a great place to wish team members "Happy Birthday," announce special events and accomplishments, acknowledge the employee of the month, and welcome new employees. Don't forget to make it fun. Try including a riddle, game, puzzle, or contest!

Design

The trick to an effective employee newsletter is to keep it simple, easy to read, and consistent. It doesn't have to be designed by a professional, but a little care and creativity will ensure it gets read. If you can, add a splash of color to brighten up the page. If color printing isn't an option, copy the newsletter onto colored paper.

Computer programs like Microsoft Word supply templates you can use to build your own newsletter, and lots of clip art to liven it up. Photographs also add a nice touch. They are perfect for showcasing a new menu item, sharing photos from a holiday party, or introducing a new employee.

Communication is a two-way street

Employee newsletters can do more than pass on information to your employees. They can also serve as a way for your employees to communicate with you and each other. Conduct a simple survey or questionnaire to measure morale, ask for opinions on new menu items, or gather ideas from a suggestion box. Then share the feedback, both good and bad, in the next issue of the newsletter. This acknowledges that you've read and value your team's feedback.

Are you ready to open the channels of communication? Put together an employee newsletter today. Download our sample employee newsletter to give you a few ideas.

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