SF strengthens labor laws on predictive scheduling, equal pay

In a move aimed to strengthen workers' rights, San Francisco supervisors on Tuesday approved new laws requiring predictive schedules for chain store retailers and for public contractors to begin reporting compensation to stamp out wage discrimination.

The pieces of legislation approved unanimously by the Board of Supervisors builds on San Francisco's reputation for becoming the first city to advance certain workers' rights, including paid sick leave, mandating health coverage and raising the minimum wage.

"Abusive scheduling practices are causing a crisis of underemployment and instability for the people that serve our food, that stock our shelves and that sweep our floors," said Supervisor Eric Mar, who collaborated on the effort with outgoing board President David Chiu. "Scheduling practices affects how much the barista who makes our morning latte takes home in pay, whether or not they receive health benefits and their ability to balance their life and work."

The legislation, which was supported by Jobs With Justice San Francisco, is expected to impact about 40,000 workers in San Francisco.

"We heard from hundreds of part-time workers who can't tell their families in any given week when they will work, how much they earn, who are struggling to juggle multiple jobs," Chiu said.

The law impacts those businesses with more than 20 employees in San Francisco and more than 20 locations worldwide. That threshold was a point of contention.

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