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Move over baseball. A cricket-themed entertainment concept is coming to Dallas

The London-based Sixes Social Cricket is scheduled to debut this summer as Major League Cricket attempts a launch across the U.S.
Sixes Social Cricket
Americans will be able to try their hand at hitting a "bowl" at Sixes Social Cricket./Photo courtesy of Sixes Social Cricket.

Cricket is coming to America this summer. And that means cricket-themed eatertainment concepts are coming too.

The first is scheduled to arrive from London this summer, just in time for the launch of Major League Cricket franchises in cities across the country, including Dallas, Los Angeles, Seattle, Washington, D.C. and New York City.

The London-based Sixes Social Cricket is scheduled to open in Dallas this summer. It’s a seven-unit concept in the U.K. that promises to “combine the thrill of cricket with a fun, social atmosphere,” according to press materials.

Not clear, however, is whether the thrill of cricket can be experienced without any understanding of the sport whatsoever.

Cricket is played and enjoyed with great passion around the world in countries that are or were part of the British empire (and, well, Holland).

The U.S., however, has long remained a cricket-free zone. When it comes to hitting balls with sticks, Americans, of course, prefer baseball, a sport that claims a World Series, even though only teams from North America can compete in it.

There are different versions of cricket, some with games that can last for days. Happily, the type of cricket coming to the U.S. is T20, or “white ball,” which is the relatively speedy version, lasting around three hours. (The longer version is called “red ball.”)

Baseball and cricket are similar in that they both involve hitting balls with bats to earn runs, but the easy comparisons probably stop there.

“Sixes” refers to the points (“runs”) earned when a batter (“batsman”) hits a small ball that is hurled at the ground by the pitcher (“bowler”) with the intent of knocking over three sticks (the “wicket”). If the batsman hits the ball, and that ball passes over the field boundary before it hits the ground, it’s a six, or six runs. (If the ball hits the ground before crossing the boundary, it’s a four.)

If the bowler knocks over the sticks, it’s an out. There are also some rules about the batsman running from one end of the pitch to another, and also complications if the bowler hits the batsman’s leg (leg before wicket, or LBW), but that’s probably more than potential American cricket fans need to know.

Oh, and there are no mitts.

Sixes Social Club will feature tech-enabled batting nets for guests to try their hand at swinging for the boundaries with soft cricket balls (the real ones could cause serious damage) to earn points by hitting targets.

On the menu will be burgers, shared plates and wood-fired pizzas, as well as a full bar with cocktails, beer, wine and shakes.

“We’re thrilled to bring Sixes to the United States, and what better city to launch our first venue than Dallas,” said Calum Mackinnon, Sixes co-founder, in a statement. “We believe that sport and hospitality hold an unrivaled ability to unite and connect people for good and good times shared and we’re confident that Sixes will become a staple of the Dallas community.”

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