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The Bottom Line

Jonathan Maze The Bottom Line

Restaurant Business Executive Editor Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Financing

Asset-light business models face an awful future

Restaurants spent too many years loading up on debt and dumping assets, and now those decisions are coming home to roost, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Financing

Why restaurants are drawing down on credit lines

Some of them need the cash, but is also reflects concerns that companies could lose access to the funds, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

As coronavirus hurts sales, ratings agencies start hitting companies that had problems before the shutdown, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The National Restaurant Association says 3% of restaurants are closed for good, and 11% could join them within a month, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

With valuations reset, investment firms not busy rescuing their existing companies could snap up restaurants at bargain prices, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Investors poured money into the industry, whose valuations had taken a beating in recent weeks, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Closed dining rooms will be the death knell for many restaurant companies, some of whom were on weak footing to begin with, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The two-month coronavirus shutdown will be bad enough, but so will the inevitable recession that follows, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Valuations for many chains suggest potentially serious problems, and that could bode ill for the entire industry, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

As local governments take steps to limit the coronavirus and sports teams cancel games, the industry faces a dramatic downturn, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

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