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The Bottom Line

Jonathan Maze The Bottom Line

Restaurant Business Executive Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Financing

Even after thousands of closures, Subway still has too many locations

Numbers the company provided last week demonstrate that it is still far off from reconciling the number of locations with demand for its sandwiches, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Financing

Why chains should hit the pause button on aggressive growth

Executives should consider more caution about development given soaring costs, future uncertainty and more traditional growth dangers, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Sales have recovered early and valuations are up. Yet the industry continues to face labor and supply challenges, which are driving prices up and could make for a long winter, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The chain’s soon-to-be-former CEO stumbled into a gay marriage controversy that sticks with the chain to this day, but RB’s The Bottom Line says its devotion to culture and service has been the key to its remarkable growth.

The robots and loyalty programs that took center stage at FSTEC have been in place in other industries for some time, says RB’s the Bottom Line.

Wall Street gave the drive-thru coffee chain an enthusiastic reception on Wednesday. Company executives believe that will help them even more, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

With sales recovering and expectations of post-pandemic growth, investment firms are making bets on small concepts again, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Dutch Bros’ drive-thru coffee and First Watch’s “daytime dining” have upended their sectors and won over fans as investors looked in other directions, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The drive-thru coffee chain set terms for its offering, which would give the company a valuation of over $3 billion.

A lot of companies made overly aggressive bets on unproven fast-casual concepts. PizzaRev was one of them, says RB's The Bottom Line.

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