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The Bottom Line

Jonathan Maze The Bottom Line

Restaurant Business Executive Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Financing

Jack in the Box’s Del Taco deal was more expensive than it seems

The Bottom Line: Executives argued that “synergies” made the deal more palatable. But it’s taking a while for those cost savings to take hold. Investors have responded accordingly.

Financing

Lower-income consumers are eating more fast food

The Bottom Line: Quick-service chains are getting more business from lower-income diners. Here’s why it might not all be a trade-down from more expensive restaurants.

The Bottom Line: Restaurant Brands International was formed in 2014 for aggressive growth. But challenges at its two biggest brands have held it back.

The Bottom Line: Restaurant menu prices kept increasing last month, according to new federal data. But other prices started to ease.

The Bottom Line: Wendy’s CEO Todd Penegor said that consumers are still eating more of their meals at home, and “it’s kind of stuck there.”

The Bottom Line: The brands’ international unit expansion has taken off, providing parent company Restaurant Brands International with a key growth pillar.

The Bottom Line: The hedge fund manager who exposed the rapidly growing fraud now calls the company’s turnaround a “miracle.”

The Bottom Line: Companies like Burger King, McDonald’s, Taco Bell and Papa John’s may be in a good position to gain share if the economy does hit a recession. History suggests they’re right.

The Bottom Line: The world’s biggest restaurant chain and the world’s biggest pizza chain are increasingly going head-to-head for budget consumers.

The Bottom Line: The fast-casual chain generates nearly $5 million in sales per unit selling chicken fingers. But that’s not the most impressive thing about it.

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