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Biography

Jonathan Maze

Editor-in-Chief

 Contact Jonathan

Restaurant Business Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Articles by
Jonathan Maze

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Financing

When will the industry recover its lost sales? That depends

At Restaurant Leadership Conference, Technomic notes some sectors are fully recovered. Others could take some time.

Financing

Should restaurants worry about the omicron variant?

A Deeper Dive: Roslyn Stone, chief operating officer of Zero Hour Health, joins the podcast to talk about the possibility of another wave and what restaurants can do to protect their workers and businesses.

The company is undertaking the first global effort to recruit new operators into the system as it looks to increase demographic representation among owner-operators.

From the Editor: RB+ subscribers will now get access to our new page tracking publicly-traded chains’ quarterly results, along with key analysis.

Private equity firm Main Post Partners has made a “strategic growth investment” in the brand, which has a presence in 2,600 locations.

But this time, the fried chicken chain is giving customers who buy a firelog, or who order on its app, a chance to win a stay at a "KFC Firelog Cabin."

The burger chain, which made a surprising deal for the Mexican concept, is not exactly ruling out another acquisition down the line.

The limited test of the iconic D.C. area product is designed to introduce more customers to the sauce around the country.

The Bottom Line: The deal signals a shifting market in the restaurant business. But it also demonstrates why executives should reconsider overreacting to activist investors.

The burger chain is paying $12.51 per share for the Mexican fast food chain to get more scale and drive more unit growth.

Customer demand led the founders of the retail brand Amy’s Kitchen to create a restaurant. The concept is now pushing to grab a bigger piece of the market.

The Bottom Line: The salad chain’s stock price has fallen 40% since its peak amid market volatility and questions about its market cap.

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