Biography

Jonathan Maze

Editor-in-Chief

 Contact Jonathan

Restaurant Business Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Articles by
Jonathan Maze

Page 1
Financing

Restaurants get dragged into The Misinformation Age

The Bottom Line: Big Mac prices, corporate views on Israel-Palestine and even store closures have been subject to misinformation and outright lies. Blame the presidential election.

Leadership

Wendy's names Abigail Pringle U.S. president

The fast-food burger chain reconfigured its leadership team again, bringing back the U.S. president position 17 months after it was eliminated. E.J. Wunsch was named president of international.

The giant food distributor Sysco said the consumer environment has been tougher on restaurants than expected this year due to higher menu prices.

The multibrand franchisee, which also operates Pizza Hut, Burger King, Dunkin’ and Taco Bell, acquired the locations in the central and Southeast U.S.

The Bottom Line: The role a giant sale-leaseback had in the bankruptcy filing of the seafood chain has drawn more criticism of the investment firms' financial engineering. The criticism is well-earned.

A Deeper Dive: Joe Pawlak, managing principal with Technomic, joins the podcast to discuss the Technomic Top 500 Chain Restaurant Report.

The Bottom Line: Some of the fastest-growing chains in the U.S. push drinks, even as sales at traditional concepts lag in growing delivery and takeout business. How can traditional restaurants get in on the action?

The Bottom Line: Giving customers meal options they can afford will be key to generating traffic this year. But make sure those offers can generate a profit.

The casual-dining chain, which filed for bankruptcy this week, is probing whether its former CEO steered all its shrimp purchasing through the company's owner, Thai Union, a shrimp supplier.

The Bottom Line: The seafood chain’s bankruptcy declaration was not surprising after months of closures and Endless Shrimp recriminations. But that doesn’t make it any less notable.

The casual-dining seafood chain, with $300 million in debt, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in one of the biggest filings in restaurant industry history.

How did a once-struggling, regional bone-in chicken chain overtake KFC, the formerly dominant player in the U.S. market? With a fixation on sandwiches and many more new restaurants.

  • Page 1