Biography

Jonathan Maze

Editor-in-Chief

 Contact Jonathan

Restaurant Business Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Articles by
Jonathan Maze

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Financing

Papa Johns has big plans to boost sales this year

The company is shifting spending from local marketing to national marketing and has plans for “major food innovation” come April.

Financing

Starbucks gets a key endorsement in its board fight with unions

Two key proxy advisory firms have endorsed the coffee chain giant's board nominees over those nominated by a union-backed group.

CEO John Chidsey told operators this week that they should remodel their locations or get out of the system. And he recruited help from franchisees who have upgraded their restaurants.

The Bottom Line: The pizza delivery chain’s business with companies like Uber Eats and DoorDash is thriving while its own delivery is slowing. But this isn’t the beginning of the end of self-delivery, CEO Rob Lynch says.

The Bottom Line: Sardar Biglari, chairman of the chain’s owner Biglari Holdings, details how the addition of kiosks and counter service has transformed restaurants.

A Deeper Dive: Robert Byrne, director of consumer and industry insights with Technomic, joins the Restaurant Business podcast to talk about fast-food value.

The fast-food burger chain walked back statements that it would test “dynamic pricing,” saying that digital menu boards would enable discounts during low-traffic parts of the day.

The former NBA player turned pitchman will not run for re-election on the board due to business commitments. But he will maintain a relationship with the pizza chain.

The pizza delivery chain added the largest number of new operators in 15 years in 2023. All of them started as delivery drivers or other employees within the system.

The Bottom Line: The burger chain mentioned last week that it would test the pricing strategy sometime next year. Consumers frustrated with prices reacted swiftly.

A federal court in January awarded the distributor $15 million for unpaid bills after saying the rotisserie chicken chain disregarded the litigation.

The Bottom Line: The federal government allowed the chain’s founder to avoid major penalties by simply paying $1,000. What’s the point of regulation in the first place?

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