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Biography

Jonathan Maze

Editor-in-Chief

 Contact Jonathan

Restaurant Business Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Articles by
Jonathan Maze

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Financing

Tim Hortons hopes higher quality and loyalty breeds success

The coffee-and-doughnut chain has been gradually improving, behind cracked eggs, new coffee and a loyalty program.

Operations

McDonald’s reinstates mask requirements in high-risk areas

Starbucks will have employees wear masks in company-owned stores as retailers take more aggressive action on masks.

As the coronavirus surges once again, workers could avoid going back to the office, delaying an already uncertain future for urban restaurants, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The chain is maintaining strong unit volumes, though pressure from competitors ate into its sales last quarter. Chicken nuggets could help.

The burger chain, which has underperformed its competitors in recent years, believes speedier remodels, better operations, more digital and balanced marketing can turn it around.

Sales at Burger King recovered but remained lower than many of its rivals while Popeyes lost some momentum.

The owner of KFC, Pizza Hut, Taco Bell and Habit opened a record number of restaurants and has increased its development expectations.

Taco Bell, Pizza Hut and Habit Burger all saw sales recover over 2019 levels while the company opened a record number of global restaurants.

The coffee giant has shifted its business over the past 18 months, with a lot more drive-thru sales and mobile orders, cold drinks and alternative milk, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The company credits higher wages and an end to unemployment benefits for bringing in more applicants but costs are driving up prices.

This week’s episode of the RB podcast “A Deeper Dive” features television writer and producer Bill Oakley, best known for The Simpsons, but also a prolific Instagram food reviewer.

The company’s U.S. same-store sales rose nearly 15% over 2019 levels, and 7% globally, as the company’s promotions and its digital sales drove business.

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