facebook pixal
Biography

Jonathan Maze

Editor-in-Chief

 Contact Jonathan

Restaurant Business Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Articles by
Jonathan Maze

Page 1
Leadership

KFC names Sabir Sami CEO

He will take over as head of the chicken chain on Jan. 1 for the retiring Tony Lowings. Dyke Shipp will become KFC president.

Financing

First Watch to raise up to $218M in its IPO

The breakfast-and-lunch chain plans to sell shares at $17 to $20 and could get a valuation of more than $1 billion.

Restaurant Brands International, which also operates Popeyes and Tim Hortons, on Wednesday vowed to cut its emissions by 50% by 2030.

Fresh Acquisitions, which filed for bankruptcy earlier this year, has a new potential buyer in Serene Investment Management after a judge killed a previous sale.

The sandwich giant says its sales are the best it’s had in years following its brand refresh and new ad campaign but the numbers show some stores are still far behind.

The newly public coffee chain’s shares soared 19% even as stocks tumbled Monday amid growth concerns.

The burger giant plans to cut 90% of the virgin fossil fuel-based plastic out of the popular items by 2025.

Sales have recovered early and valuations are up. Yet the industry continues to face labor and supply challenges, which are driving prices up and could make for a long winter, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

In social media posts and restaurants’ own signs, a lack of workers is leading to shorter hours and fewer service lines.

The chain’s soon-to-be-former CEO stumbled into a gay marriage controversy that sticks with the chain to this day, but RB’s The Bottom Line says its devotion to culture and service has been the key to its remarkable growth.

His son Andrew Truett Cathy will take over as the chicken chain’s third chief executive on Nov. 1, following a transition.

Yum Brands wants its concepts to grow individually, meaning it likely won’t expand the pizza chain’s delivery to its other concepts, at least for now.

  • Page 1