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The Bottom Line

Jonathan Maze The Bottom Line

Restaurant Business Executive Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Financing

Strong restaurant sales could keep going for a while

Industry have surged this year and increased again in July. That could last a while despite the delta variant, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Financing

Why it’s too early to take that victory lap

Restaurant industry sales have surged this year. These increases are so broad-based that it suggests a stiff tailwind, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

As the coronavirus surges once again, workers could avoid going back to the office, delaying an already uncertain future for urban restaurants, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The coffee giant has shifted its business over the past 18 months, with a lot more drive-thru sales and mobile orders, cold drinks and alternative milk, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The pizza delivery chain says it has lower labor costs within in its restaurants than it would like, which is hurting service, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

The burrito chain has regained its business model five years after it was lost following its food safety crisis, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Three restaurant chains have confidentially filed documents for an initial public offering and others are considering it, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Restaurants generated more than $70 billion in sales last month as it has recovered from the pandemic. But how consumers use restaurants is different, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

Sales continue to surge at many restaurant chains as operators raise prices and customers make bigger orders. But traffic will have to be a concern eventually, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

While operators use signs to complain about the lack of workers, employees use them to stage walkouts, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

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