The Bottom Line

Jonathan Maze The Bottom Line

Restaurant Business Executive Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Maze is a longtime industry journalist who writes about restaurant finance, mergers and acquisitions and the economy, with a particular focus on quick-service restaurants. He writes daily about the factors influencing the operating environment, including labor and food costs and various industry trends such as technology and delivery.

Jonathan has been widely quoted in media publications such as the New York Times and the Washington Post and has appeared on CNBC, Yahoo Finance and NPR. He writes a weekly finance-focused newsletter for Restaurant Business, The Bottom Line, and is the host of the weekly podcast “A Deeper Dive.”

Financing

Wendy's, whose chairman is an activist, may be getting an activist

The Bottom Line: Activist investor Blackwells apparently plans to nominate “several directors” to the burger chain’s board, according to Reuters.

Financing

The Subway saga takes another turn

The Bottom Line: Just when we thought the massive deal was set to go through, the feds stepped in to have their say.

The Bottom Line: Major pizza chains, notably Domino’s, have lost some valuable customers to companies like DoorDash.

The Bottom Line: Large retailers are concerned about a softening consumer and already see evidence that is happening. But restaurant executives seem far more optimistic.

The Bottom Line: Remodel requirements can be vital for brands to generate sales. But they can create financial problems for franchisees when not done right.

The Bottom Line: Attendees and speakers painted an anxious picture of the operating environment at the Restaurant Finance and Development Conference. Here’s why that might be here for a while.

The Bottom Line: The fast-food chain introduced the product in August and, according to its largest franchisee, the product has sold well. But it’s also simple to operate.

The Bottom Line: Burger King operator Carrols, Cava and Wingstop were the big winners. But there were plenty of concepts that would rather have that one back.

The Bottom Line: A rash of bankruptcy filings shows that small brands and franchisees continue to deal with the aftermath of the pandemic, three and a half years later.

The Bottom Line: Negative transactions are so common that restaurant brands are thrilled simply not to lose customers. That could be a bigger challenge going forward.

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