Leadership

KFC U.S. names Nick Chavez CMO

The Nintendo of America executive will lead marketing for the chicken chain.
KFC CMO
Photograph: Shutterstock

KFC U.S. on Friday named former Nintendo of America executive Nick Chavez chief marketing officer.

Chavez will take over as marketing chief for the Louisville, Ky.-based chicken chain on Nov. 29. He will lead marketing, advertising, public relations, media and consumer insights.

Nick Chavez KFCHe takes over for Andrea Zahumensky, who left the company in April.

Chavez spent more than 11 years with Nintendo, most recently as senior vice president of sales, marketing and communications. He was responsible for marketing in the U.S. and Canada.

He led sales and marketing for the Nintendo Switch gaming system, changed the brand’s product launch processes and led marketing for more than 200 game titles. Before Nintendo he worked with Yahoo.

Kevin Hochman, president of KFC U.S., called Chavez “a proven leader who has a track record of demonstrating the smart, heart and courage leadership needed at Yum and KFC.”

Chavez called his new role an “opportunity to help chart the future of the KFC brand.”

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