Workforce

Why restaurant managers leave

A new study ranks the reasons for management turnover.

What prompts restaurant managers to clean out their offices and head out with a last paycheck? A new survey suggests the triggers may be changing with the times.

The canvass of 2,000 restaurant professionals, conducted by placement firm Gecko Hospitality, shows lifestyle issues abounding among the top 10 reasons for parting with a restaurant employer last year. Appearing near the top of the rankings are such factors as the desire or refusal to relocate (No. 3), a long commute (No. 6 for women, No. 9 for men) and the catchall quality of life (No. 7 for both genders.)

Straight monetary considerations appear as a top 10 reason only for women, at No. 8, though pay levels presumably figure into the most common reason for a resignation by either sex: a shot at a better opportunity.

The industry’s sales challenges are reflected in the appearance on the lists of downsizing (No. 10 for men, no mention for women) and the business closing (Nos. 6 and 9 for men and women, respectively.) Being fired is the second most common reason for a departure for both genders.

Here are the gender-specific lists:

Top 10 reasons female managers leave

  1. Better opportunity
  2. Unemployed
  3. Relocation
  4. Not satisfied
  5. No growth
  6. Long commute
  7. Quality of life
  8. Monetary
  9. Business closed
  10. Returning to another industry
     

Top 10 reasons male managers leave

  1. Better opportunity
  2. Unemployed
  3. Relocation
  4. Not satisfied
  5. No growth
  6. Business closed
  7. Quality of life
  8. Returning to another industry
  9. Long commute
  10. Downsized
     

Source: Gecko Hospitality Salary Survey Report 2017

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