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Tim Hortons is leaving plastic cutlery in 2022

The coffee chain is launching a variety of initiatives aimed at reducing waste, including eliminating plastic cutlery in its Canadian restaurants.
Tim Hortons
Tim Hortons is currently testing a fiber lid for hot beverages, which is plastic-free and recyclable. / Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Tim Hortons restaurants across Canada are entering the new year with sustainable cutlery.

The coffee chain is introducing wooden and fiber cutlery in early 2023. The wooden cutlery and fiber spoon are both compostable and will eliminate the use of 90 million single-use plastics a year, according to a statement.

The brand will also replace the plastic lids on its Loaded Bowls with fiber versions and plans to introduce a new breakfast and lunch wrapper early next year. The wrapper design uses 75% less material than the prior wrap box, which the chain estimates will save more than 1,400 tons of material a year.

In addition, Tim Hortons is currently testing a fiber lid for hot beverages, which is plastic-free and recyclable. The test is live in Vancouver and will run for about 12 weeks.  

The brand will also eliminate single-use bags and begin offering reusable bags for purchase starting in January.

Tim Hortons’ reuse efforts don’t stop there. The Toronto-based chain is teaming up with Return—It, a reusable container company, on a reusable cup pilot program. The project gives customers the option of paying a deposit for a reusable, returnable cup. The pilot launched in May at 10 restaurants and has grown to include nine public bins for turning cups in and a total of more than 60 cup return points across the city, according to a statement. Additionally, two more Tim Hortons restaurants have since begun to trial the pilot.

"Through our sustainability platform Tims for Good, we're always looking for ways, big and small, to make thoughtful choices on material and design in order to reduce and eliminate packaging and contribute to more sustainable innovation," said Paul Yang, senior director of procurement, sustainability and packaging at Tim Hortons.

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