Financing

Window opens for pandemic aid to Texas restaurants

Under a state program specifically for travel and hospitality businesses, establishments can qualify for grants of up to $20,000.
Photograph: Shutterstock

Texas is now accepting applications from local restaurants that were walloped by the pandemic for up to $20,000 each in recovery aid.

The funds are part of a $180 million assistance pool that was formed by the state specifically to help Texas’ tourism, travel and hospitality businesses rebound from the crisis.

Allocation of the grant money has been staggered, with different eligible sectors invited to submit requests for the aid at different times. The window for eating and drinking places to apply is open until Nov. 22.

The request process has already ended for hotels.

To qualify, establishments must have been in business by Jan. 2020; be open to the public currently; be privately owned; and can prove they suffered economically during the pandemic.  

The $180 million earmarked for the Texas Travel Industry Recovery Grant Program was provided to the state under the federal American Rescue Plan Act of 2021. The program is being run through the office of Texas Gov. Gregg Abbott.

 More information can be obtained by writing to tourismrecoverygrant@gov.texas.gov  or looking here.

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