Beverage

Bluestone Lane inks a co-branding deal with Hilton

The cafe chain will offer its products in the lodging giant's new Tempo line.
Bluestone cups
Photo courtesy of Hilton

Bluestone Lane has loaded its development pipeline with at least 11 more U.S. sites through a deal to offer its signature drinks and menu items within a new line of “lifestyle” hotels being introduced by Hilton.

Under the arrangement, Tempo by Hilton properties will exclusively feature Bluestone-brand coffee, tea and latte products. Cafes within the hotels will also feature Bluestone menu specialties. The partners cite such possible examples as the chain’s Avocado Smash, chili-spiced egg scrambles, grain-based bowls and wraps.

The announcement did not indicate if the cafes will carry the Bluestone Lane name.

In addition, Bluestone products will be included in the small-plate menu that Hilton plans to offer as part of its evening bar service.

Packaged items will be available for grab-and-go customers, according to the partners.

New York City-based Bluestone currently has 55 locations in the United States, according to Hilton.

The lodging giant’s website for Tempo indicates that 11 of the hotels are currently under development within the U.S.  Hilton says the properties are aimed at the modern traveler, with an open-lobby design.

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