facebook pixal

Coronavirus

Industries all across the country are experiencing the disruptive impact of the COVID-19 Coronavirus. Discover how it could affect the U.S. foodservice, grocery and convenience industries.


Financing

With plummeting sales, franchisees face a brutal future

The coronavirus shock is putting considerable pressure on franchisees large and small, and franchisors are already taking steps to ease the problem.

Operations

Epidemic will cost restaurants $225B short-term, National Restaurant Association says

In a letter requesting $145 billion in direct aid to eating and drinking places, the Association said 5-7 million industry jobs could be lost.

Chuck E. Cheese and Dave & Buster’s face weeks without game-playing customers, which could be devastating.

Students will learn remotely for the rest of the semester.

No matter where they are located, operations need to come up with creative ways to generate revenue amid the outbreak, Advice Guy says.

With some operators calling it a “bait and switch,” the third-party delivery provider is offering up new details on its repayment guidelines for restaurants.

After holding conversations with quick-service CEOs, the White House also disclosed that it plans to send cash to consumers to stoke spending. A small-business relief package is also in the works.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin says measures will allow closed restaurants to continue paying their employees. Loans and direct payments to consumers would be part of a $1 trillion relief package.

The meals will be delivered to students in rural areas who don’t have access to a Summer Food Service Program meal site.

Organization turns its attention to Total Store Expo in August.

“Mobilizing food is one of the biggest challenges,” says the foundation’s executive director.

H-E-B and others shun special time slots while urging consumers to use click-and-collect and delivery.

As the chain closes dining areas amid the spread of coronavirus, it is working to ensure its operators have the cash to get through a sales slump.

The pandemic is forcing operators to come up with creative solutions to feed their customers.

Nicotine users may be stocking up as a precaution during COVID-19 outbreak

Illinois and New York have OK'd sales for off-premise, and New York and Ohio have permitted returns of unused St. Patrick’s stockpiles.

The comment period has been extended by 30 days and will now end on April 22.

As consumers increasingly shelter in place to help stem the spread of the coronavirus, Instacart is challenged to meet the record demand for grocery delivery services.

All schools in the state are closed for several weeks to help slow the spread of COVID-19.

Operators need to cut costs, focus on takeout and delivery and think outside the box as they face a long period with little sales.

  • Page 114