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What Trump’s emergency plan means for restaurants

The president aired a number of extraordinary economic measures last night in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Here are the ones of particular importance to restaurants.

Operations

NYC considers capping delivery-service commissions

Legislation introduced this morning would also prohibit the services from charging for calls that don’t result in a sale, and require that the commission portion of a delivery sale be revealed to consumers.

The redefinition narrows the circumstances under which a restaurant brand's owner can be held accountable for a franchisee's possible violation of union protection laws.

Proposals under consideration would require proof of a just cause, as well as remedial action beforehand. Employers would also have to meet certain requirements to cut hours and lay off staff. And its proponents leave no doubt that they expect the measures to catch on across the country.

Salaried restaurant employees would not be exempt starting next year unless they earn more than $40,460.

As of 2021, salaried employees earning less than $45,500 will be entitled to time and a half for hours exceeding 12 per day or 40 per week.

Its new rule spells out when a restaurant franchisor is liable for the compensation and scheduling practices of its franchisees, eliminating much of the uncertainty that fostered legal actions.

But other industries will lose that break for employers under proposals that were put forth this week.

The decision from the NLRB reverses its policy that employees had the right to use their employers’ email to communicate with co-workers about nonwork matters, including unionization.

The law would also eliminate the use of foam-type drink cups as of 2022.

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