coronavirus

Industries all across the country are experiencing the disruptive impact of the COVID-19. Discover how it could affect the U.S. foodservice, grocery and convenience industries.

Operations

States ease liquor laws to help restaurants

Illinois and New York have OK'd sales for off-premise, and New York and Ohio have permitted returns of unused St. Patrick’s stockpiles.

Financing

Be scrappy: How restaurants can survive as their sales plunge

Operators need to cut costs, focus on takeout and delivery and think outside the box as they face a long period with little sales.

Growing restrictions and fear are keeping people at home as more than two-thirds of operators tell Black Box their traffic is down.

Valuations for many chains suggest potentially serious problems, and that could bode ill for the entire industry, says RB’s The Bottom Line.

With some operators calling it a “bait and switch,” the third-party delivery provider is offering up new details on its repayment guidelines for restaurants.

After holding conversations with quick-service CEOs, the White House also disclosed that it plans to send cash to consumers to stoke spending. A small-business relief package is also in the works.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin says measures will allow closed restaurants to continue paying their employees. Loans and direct payments to consumers would be part of a $1 trillion relief package.

A requirement that citizens be home by a certain hour could be an alternative to forcing restaurants to close or discontinue dine-in service.

The president and health officials also called on citizens to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people, at home as well as outside.

As many states forbid dine-in service in the wake of the coronavirus, restaurant operators around the country are looking for help and answers.

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