Edit

Technology

The latest news and trends in restaurant technology
Technology

The latest vending machine technology

If you're strolling down Santa Monica Boulevard in Beverly Hills and suddenly get a hankering for a snack, you won't have to settle for a candy bar spit out by a regular old vending machine. Instead, snag a fresh cupcake from the Sprinkles Cupcake ATM. It's restocked all day and night for continuous cupcake delivery.

Technology

MONO+MONO goes retro with menu tech

In a Korean eatery in New York’s East Village, what’s old is new again, from the more than 30,000 vinyl albums on the walls to the View-Masters on the tables.

Launched in late 2011, the free Chefs Feed app for iPhone and iPad has quickly become a favorite with chefs and their fans, registering more than 100,000 users in less than a year.

David Jones operates five Blazing Onion locations, but only one has achieved a coveted four-star average review on Yelp.

Instead of fighting the growing trend of restaurant customers posting photos of their menu orders, Felipe Donnelly, owner of Cómodo, a four-month old Latin American eatery in Soho, New York, has embraced it, using the photos to create what is being called the first Instagram menu.

It’s not quite an avalanche, but iPad point of sale software is unfurling out into the marketplace at a heightened pace. Touting wireless connectivity, anywhere, anytime access and quick response to menu and room changes, the field is crowded with options, as newcomers to the market, like Lavu and Breadcrumb, join more established POS vendors like Micros, Revel Systems and Aloha.

Can you say digital tablet? Even though the mjaority of restaurants have yet to incorporate technology in their operations, consumers are very interested in the latest technology applications when dining out, according to a new study by Technomic

In April, T.G.I. Friday's released its own mobile payment app. While many foodservice operations have embraced mobile apps for location services, coupon offers or linking into reward programs, proprietary mobile payment apps are still somewhat unchartered territory. In the quick serve arena, Dunkin Donuts just released its own mobile payment system, and Starbucks partnered with Square for its system.

Dunkin’ Donuts and Baskin-Robbins have joined a consortium of retail businesses that’s developing a standard way for consumers to pay for purchases with smart phones.

Once the intruders find a way into the technology of a certain chain, they’ll proceed franchisee by franchisee or restaurant by restaurant.