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Workforce

Best practices for improving recruitment, retention and training

Workforce

Training millennials

Getting millennial recruits up to snuff means re-evaluating longstanding procedures, such as handbooks and classroom learning, in order to jive with the tendencies and preferences of this always-questioning, tech-dependent demographic.

Workforce

Handbook don’ts

The National Labor Relations Board is recommending that business owners review their employee handbooks before it lands them in trouble.

“The biggest mistakes I’ve made are people mistakes,” Brolick told Dawn Sweeney, president and CEO of the National Restaurant Association in front of a packed audience at the Restaurant Leadership Conference.

How a friendly neighborhood coffee shop in Idaho took control of its books.

Millennials aren’t afraid to talk to anyone in an organization; they’re driven to achieve; they embrace tech to ease processes.

Virtual job postings may seem like a savings, but only when matched with the right positions.

Many sitting in the C-suite have found that, when soliciting employee feedback, a strict reliance on the Internet won’t work.

For TGI Fridays U.K., CEO Karen Forrester’s people-first strategy has paid off in more ways than one.

There are two kinds of restaurant back offices—and one is a lot more profitable than the other.

A Women’s Foodservice Forum study earmarked “building networks” among the top three competencies of successful women in the industry. See how to tailor that effort to your style.

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