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Marketing

Restaurant marketing ideas and trends

Marketing

Point of origin stories bring authenticity to the table

As the list of food sourcing information keeps growing, from all-natural to sustainable and antibiotic-free to grass-fed, operators face the challenge of deciding which stories to tell.

Marketing

One-to-one marketing plus 4 more tech trends from RLC

While “millennial” was one of the top buzzwords of the Restaurant Leadership Conference last week, much of the conversation revolved around how this demographic interacts with brands—which means technology.

Restaurateurs are taking an inward look in March, examining what’s working and what’s not in their organizations and weeding out what they deem not worthy. Here are three ways business are being shaken up right now.

While there’s no one-size-fits-all approach, making sure your online information is updated and accurate can go a long way toward ensuring customers can find you. With that in mind, here are four tips for search engine optimization (or SEO) operators can use to improve their rankings.

Technology and social media fueled many of the year’s marketing successes and missteps at restaurants. A couple of operators, though, found new life in old tricks, doubling down on discounting and resurrecting in-demand LTOs.

To generate buzz for the release of its new smartphone app on Oct. 28, Taco Bell went silent on all of its social media channels for one day, replacing its characteristically prolific posts with one disruptive message: “Taco Bell isn’t on Instagram [or Twitter or Facebook], it’s #onlyintheapp.” It was accompanied by a link to download the new app, designed heavily around mobile ordering and payment.

Ask any number of restaurant executives for a peek at their New Year’s resolutions and finding a way to give a jolt to traffic will top most lists.

On the day it unveiled its new tuition-reimbursement plan for employees, Starbucks was met with a crush of interest from the media and corporate America pushing to know more about CEO Howard Schultz’s latest HR ploy.

Conventional business wisdom says it costs five to 10 times more to acquire a new customer than to keep an existing one.

In the Social Media Age, the language that constitutes a formal complaint has evolved.